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Trichorhinophalangeal Syndrome Type III

Synonyms of Trichorhinophalangeal Syndrome Type III

  • Sugio-Kajii Syndrome
  • TRPS3

Disorder Subdivisions

  • No subdivisions found.

General Discussion

Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type III (TRPS3), also known as Sugio-Kajii syndrome, is an extremely rare inherited multisystem disorder. TRPS3 is characterized by fine, thin light-colored hair; unusual facial features; abnormalities of the fingers and/or toes; and multiple abnormalities of the "growing ends" (epiphyses) of the bones (skeletal dysplasia), especially in the hands and feet. Characteristic facial features may include a pear-shaped or rounded (bulbous) nose; an abnormally long prominent groove (philtrum) in the upper lip; and/or abnormalities such as delayed eruption of teeth. In addition, affected individuals also exhibit severe shortening of the fingers and toes (brachydactyly) due to improper development of bones in the hands and feet (metacarpophalangeal shortening). Additional features often include short stature (dwarfism) and/or additional skeletal abnormalities. The range and severity of symptoms may vary from case to case. TRPS3 is thought to have autosomal dominant inheritance.

Symptoms

The symptoms of trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type III may vary in range and severity from case to case. Common symptoms include fine, thin light-colored hair; unusual facial features; multiple abnormalities affecting the "growing ends" (epiphyses) of the certain bones, particularly those in the hands and feet; severe shortening of the fingers and toes (brachydactyly); and/or additional skeletal abnormalities.

Infants with TRPS3 may exhibit markedly thin, sparse scalp hair at birth (congenital). The hair may also be usually fine and brittle. Affected infants also have several characteristic facial features. These may include a pear-shaped or rounded (bulbous) nose with small, underdeveloped nostrils (hypoplastic alae nasi); an abnormally long broad groove (philtrum) on the upper lip as well as a long, protruding upper lip; underdeveloped cheek bones (malar hypoplasia); and/or an abnormally prominent upper jaw bone (maxilla). Affected individuals may also exhibit dental abnormalities including delayed eruption and/or abnormal positioning (malocclusion) of the teeth.

In most cases, individuals with TRPS3 have several abnormalities of the hands and feet. Affected individuals may exhibit severe shortening of the fingers and toes (brachydactyly) due, in part, to incomplete development of bones in the hands (e.g., metacarpals), the feet (e.g., metatarsals), and the fingers and toes (phalanges). In addition, the "growing ends" (epiphyses) of the bones of the fingers and toes may be abnormally "cone-shaped" and may harden (ossify) before growth is complete (premature fusion). Most affected individuals exhibit permanent fixation of the fingers in a bent position (clinodactyly).

Affected individuals may also exhibit additional skeletal abnormalities including short stature, inflammation of the bone and cartilage in the spinal column (osteochondritis), abnormal sideways curvature of the spine (thoracic scoliosis), abnormal prominence of the breast bone (pectus carinatum), and/or limited movements of certain joints. In addition, some females affected by this disorder may exhibit abnormally broad hip development with advancing age.

Causes

Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type III is inherited in an autosomal dominant trait. Genetic diseases are determined by two genes, one received from the father and one from the mother.

Dominant genetic disorders occur when only a single copy of an abnormal gene is necessary for the appearance of the disease. The abnormal gene can be inherited from either parent, or can be the result of a new mutation (gene change) in the affected individual. The risk of passing the abnormal gene from affected parent to offspring is 50% for each pregnancy regardless of the sex of the resulting child.

Most cases of TRPS3 occur due to changes or disruptions (mutations) of the TRPS1 located on the long arm of chromosome 8 (8q24.12). Chromosomes, which are present in the nucleus of human cells, carry the genetic information for each individual. Pairs of human chromosomes are numbered from 1 through 22, and an additional 23rd pair of sex chromosomes which include one X and one Y chromosome in males and two X chromosomes in females. Each chromosome has a short arm designated "p" and a long arm designated "q". Chromosomes are further sub-divided into many bands that are numbered. For example, "chromosome 8q24.12" refers to band 24.12 on the long arm of chromosome 8. The numbered bands specify the location of the thousands of genes that are present on each chromosome.

The physical findings and symptoms associated with TRPS3 may vary greatly from case to case (variable expressivity).

Affected Populations

Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type III is an extremely rare disorder that, in theory, affects males and females in equal numbers. However, of the reported cases, most affected individuals have been female. Approximately 15 cases have been reported in the medical literature.

Related Disorders

Symptoms of the following disorders can be similar to those of Trichorhinophalangeal Syndrome Type III (TRPS3). Comparisons may be useful for a differential diagnosis:

Trichorhinophalangeal Syndrome Type I (TRPS1) is an extremely rare inherited multisystem disorder characterized with symptoms and physical features similar to those associated with TRPS3. These may include fine, thin hair; a rounded (bulbous) "pear-shaped" nose; dental anomalies; multiple abnormalities of the "growing ends" (epiphyses) of bones, particularly in the hands and feet; abnormally short (brachydactyly) and curved fingers and toes; and/or short stature (dwarfism). In most cases, the shortening of the fingers and toes in individuals with TRPS1 is typically much less severe than in individuals with TRPS3. Trichorhinophalangeal Syndrome Type I has autosomal dominant inheritance. (For more information on this disorder, choose "Trichorhinophalangeal Syndrome Type I" as your search term in the Rare Disease Database.)

Trichorhinophalangeal Syndrome Type II (TRPS2), also known as Langer-Giedion Syndrome, is an extremely rare inherited disorder with symptoms and physical features similar to those associated with TRPS1 and TRPS3. These may include thin, sparse scalp hair; a rounded (bulbous) nose; a long, prominent groove (philtrum) of the upper lip; abnormally short fingers and toes (brachydactyly); and/or short stature. The shortening of the fingers and toes in individuals with TRPS2 is typically less severe than in individuals with TRPS3. In addition, an infant with Trichorhinophalangeal Syndrome Type II may also exhibit other abnormalities not associated with TRPS3 such as an unusually small head (microcephaly), excess (redundant) skin, multiple bony growths projecting from the surface of various bones of the body (exostoses), and/or mental retardation. Most cases of Trichorhinophalangeal Syndrome Type II occur randomly (sporadically) as the result of missing genetic material (deletions) on chromosome 8. A few individuals with TRPS II have had children, but the chromosome deletion may be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. (For more information on this disorder, choose "Trichorhinophalangeal Syndrome Type II" as your search term in the Rare Disease Database.)

Ruvalcaba Syndrome is a very rare inherited disorder that is characterized by unusual facial features, abnormalities of the fingers and/or toes, additional skeletal abnormalities, and/or mental retardation. Characteristic abnormalities of the head and facial (craniofacial) area may include an unusually small head (microcephaly), a high forehead, "beaked" nose, small mouth, and/or dental abnormalities. Certain bones of the hands (i.e., metacarpals) and feet (i.e., metatarsals) may be abnormally short, resulting in abnormally short fingers and toes (brachydactyly). In addition, in some cases, fingers may be permanently bent in a fixed position (clinodactyly). Affected individuals may also exhibit short stature, sideways (scoliosis) and/or front-to-back (kyphosis) curvature of the spine, abnormal prominence of the breast bone (pectus carinatum). Ruvalcaba Syndrome has autosomal dominant inheritance. (For more information on this disorder, choose "Ruvalcaba" as your search term in the Rare Disease Database.)

Standard Therapies

Diagnosis
A diagnosis of trichrhinophalangeal syndome type III may be suspected based upon identification of characteristic physical features (e.g., fine, sparse hair; facial abnormalities; etc.). The diagnosis may be confirmed by a thorough clinical evaluation, a detailed patient history, and X-ray studies of the skeleton that reveal severe shortening of bones in the hands and feet (i.e., metacarpals, metatarsals, and phalanges) and the abnormal development of the "growing ends" (epiphyses) of the phalangeal bones (epiphyseal coning).

Treatment
The treatment of TRPS3 is directed toward the specific symptoms that are apparent in each individual. Treatment may require the coordinated efforts of a team of specialists. Pediatricians, dental specialists, orthopedic surgeons, and other health care professionals may need to systematically and comprehensively plan an affected child's treatment.

Specific therapies for the treatment of TRPS3 are symptomatic and supportive. Various orthopedic techniques, including surgery, may be used to help treat and/or correct skeletal abnormalities. Physical therapy may be prescribed to help improve the range of motion in the hips and various joints. Additional therapeutic and/or supportive measures may be necessary in some cases.

Genetic counseling will be of benefit for affected individuals and their families. Other treatment in symptomatic and supportive.

Investigational Therapies

Information on current clinical trials is posted on the Internet at www.clinicaltrials.gov. All studies receiving U.S. government funding, and some supported by private industry, are posted on this government website.

For information about clinical trials being conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD, contact the NIH Patient Recruitment Office:

Tollfree: (800) 411-1222
TTY: (866) 411-1010
Email: prpl@cc.nih.gov

For information about clinical trials sponsored by private sources, contact:
www.centerwatch.com

Organizations related to Trichorhinophalangeal Syndrome Type III

(Please note that some of these organizations may provide information concerning certain conditions potentially associated with this disorder [e.g., short stature, bone abnormalities, etc.])

References

TEXTBOOKS
Hicks J. Trichorhinophalangeal Syndrome Type III. In: NORD Guide to Rare Disorders. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Philadelphia, PA. 2003:731-2.

Gorlin RJ, et al., eds. Syndromes of the Head and Neck, 3rd ed. New York, NY: Oxford University Press; 1990:806-11.

Buyce ML., ed. Birth Defects Encyclopedia. Dover, MA: Blackwell Scientific Publications; For: The Center for Birth Defects Information Services Inc; 1990: 1701-02.

JOURNAL ARTICLES
Itin PH, et al. Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type III. Dermatology. 1996;193:349-52.

Nagai T, et al. Another family with tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome type III (Sugio-Kajii syndrome). Am J Med Genet. 1994;49:278-80.

Niikawa N, et al. The Sugio-Kajii syndrome, proposed tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome type III. Am J Med Genet. 1986;24:759-60.

Sugio Y, et al. Ruvalcaba syndrome: autosomal dominant inheritance. Am J Med Genet. 1984;19:741-53.

FROM THE INTERNET
McKusick VA, ed. Online Mendelian Inheritance In Man (OMIM). Johns Hopkins University, Last Edit Date 6/1/94, Entry Number 190351; Last Edit Date 8/14/96, Entry Number 180870.

The information in NORD’s Rare Disease Database is for educational purposes only. It should never be used for diagnostic or treatment purposes. If you have questions regarding a medical condition, always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional. NORD’s reports provide a brief overview of rare diseases. For more specific information, we encourage you to contact your personal physician or the agencies listed as “Resources” on this report.

Report last updated: 2008/05/25 00:00:00 GMT+0

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