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Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

Abstract

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NORD is very grateful to Jared Grantham, MD, Harry Statland Professor of Nephrology, University Distinguished Professor, Associate Dean for Medical Graduate Studies, Kidney Institute, University of Kansas Medical Center, for assistance in the preparation of this report.

Synonyms of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

  • ADPKD

Disorder Subdivisions

  • ADPKD1
  • ADPKD2

General Discussion

Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a genetic disorder characterized by the formation of cysts within the kidneys. Symptoms caused by cyst formation in the kidneys include high blood pressure (hypertension), pain on the sides of the body between the last rib and the hip (flank pain), blood in the urine (hematuria) and progressively poor function of the kidneys (kidney insufficiency). In approximately 60 percent of cases, ADPKD eventually progresses to cause end stage renal disease, requiring renal replacement therapy, either dialysis or renal transplantation. ADPKD is not simply a kidney disorder and other organ systems of the body can potentially be affected (multisystem disorder) by the development of cysts. The specific symptoms present in each person depend upon the specific organ systems involved. The liver, pancreas, a membrane covering the spinal cord and brain (arachnoid membrane), the prostate, and the glands of the male reproductive tract that produce fluid that is part of semen (seminal vesicles) may become involved. Abnormalities affecting the heart and blood vessels (cardiovascular system) may also occur in individuals with ADPKD. ADPKD usually does not become apparent until the fourth or fifth decade and was once known as “adult” polycystic kidney disease. However, it has been reported in children and infants. ADPKD is caused by mutations of one of two genes that create certain proteins essential for the proper health of the kidneys and other parts of the body. Approximately 85 % have ADPKD1, the most aggressive form of the disease; those with ADPKD2 progress to kidney insufficiency about 20 years later.

Organizations related to Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

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