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Factor XI Deficiency

Abstract

You are reading a NORD Rare Disease Report Abstract. NORD’s full collection of reports on over 1200 rare diseases is available to subscribers (click here for details). We are now also offering two full rare disease reports per day to visitors on our Web site.

NORD is very grateful to Paula H. B. Bolton-Maggs, BMBCh, DM, FRCP, FRC Path, Department of Clinical Haematology, Manchester Royal Infirmary, United Kingdom, for assistance in the preparation of this report.

Synonyms of Factor XI Deficiency

  • haemophilia C
  • hemophilia C
  • plasma thromboplastin antecedent deficiency
  • PTA deficiency
  • Rosenthal syndrome

Disorder Subdivisions

  • No subdivisions found.

General Discussion

Summary
Factor XI deficiency is a rare genetic bleeding disorder caused by reduced levels and insufficient activity of a blood protein called factor XI. Factor XI is a clotting factor. Clotting factors are specialized proteins that are essential for proper clotting, the process by which blood solidifies like glue to plug the site of a wound to stop bleeding. Individuals with factor XI deficiency do not bleed faster or more profusely than healthy individuals, but, because their blood clots poorly, they may have difficulty stopping the flow of blood from a deep or surgical wound. This may be referred to as prolonged bleeding or a prolonged bleeding episode. The severity of factor XI deficiency can vary from one person to another. In many cases, prolonged bleeding episodes only occur after surgery, dental procedures or trauma. Bleeding tendencies in factor XI deficiency are unpredictable and inconsistent, making the disorder difficult to manage in some cases. Factor XI deficiency is caused by disruptions or changes (mutations) to the F11 gene. Factor XI deficiency is inherited autosomally and can occur in people of either sex.

Introduction
Factor XI deficiency was first described in the medical literature in 1953. It used to be also referred to as hemophilia C in order to distinguish it from the better known hemophilia types A and B. In rare cases, factor XI deficiency can be acquired during life (acquired factor XI deficiency). This report deals with the genetic form. Although the genetic form is present at birth, as it is a mild bleeding disorder symptoms do not usually occur until later in life.

Factor XI Deficiency Resources

Please note that some of these organizations may provide information concerning certain conditions potentially associated with this disorder.

NORD Member Organizations:

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The information in NORD’s Rare Disease Database is for educational purposes only. It should never be used for diagnostic or treatment purposes. If you have questions regarding a medical condition, always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional. NORD’s reports provide a brief overview of rare diseases. For more specific information, we encourage you to contact your personal physician or the agencies listed as “Resources” on this report.

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