You are here: Home / Rare Disease Information / Rare Disease Database

Search Rare Diseases

Enter a disease name or synonym to search NORD's database of reports.

0-9 - A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z

Factor XIII Deficiency

Abstract

You are reading a NORD Rare Disease Report Abstract. NORD’s full collection of reports on over 1200 rare diseases is available to subscribers (click here for details). We are now also offering two full rare disease reports per day to visitors on our Web site.

NORD is very grateful to Aida Inbal, MD, Professor in Hematology, Director Hematology Clinic and Thrombosis and Hemostasis Unit, Beilinson Hospital, Rabin Medical Center, Israel, for assistance in the preparation of this report.

Synonyms of Factor XIII Deficiency

  • congenital factor XIII deficiency
  • fibrin stabilizing factor deficiency
  • inherited factor XIII deficiency

Disorder Subdivisions

  • No subdivisions found.

General Discussion

Summary
Factor XIII deficiency is a rare, genetic bleeding disorder characterized by deficiency of clotting factor XIII. Clotting factors are specialized proteins that are essential for the blood to clot properly. Specifically, individuals with factor XIII deficiency form blood clots like normal, but these clots are unstable and often break down, resulting in prolonged, uncontrolled bleeding episodes. Factor XIII also affects other processes in the body and is known to play a role in proper wound healing and pregnancy. The severity of factor XIII deficiency bleeds can vary greatly from one person to another. Some individuals may have only mild symptoms; other individuals may have severe, life-threatening bleeds. With early diagnosis and prompt treatment, the more serious bleeds of factor XIII deficiency can be avoided. FXIII consists of two subunits: subunit A and subunit B. Most of the Factor XIII deficiency states are caused by mutations in subunit A; very few have a mutation in subunit B. Factor XIII deficiency is inherited as an autosomal recessive disorder.

Introduction
This report deals with the genetic form of factor XIII deficiency, which is present at birth (congenital); the disorder can also be acquired during life. Although the genetic form is present at birth, symptoms may not become apparent until later during life. Congenital factor XIII deficiency was first described in the medical literature by Duckert, et al., in 1960.

Organizations related to Factor XIII Deficiency

The information in NORD’s Rare Disease Database is for educational purposes only. It should never be used for diagnostic or treatment purposes. If you have questions regarding a medical condition, always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional. NORD’s reports provide a brief overview of rare diseases. For more specific information, we encourage you to contact your personal physician or the agencies listed as “Resources” on this report.

0-9 - A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z

NORD's Rare Disease Information Database is copyrighted and may not be published without the written consent of NORD.

 
Copyright ©2014 NORD - National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. All rights reserved.