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Esophageal Atresia and/or Tracheoesophageal Fistula

Abstract

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NORD is very grateful to Lewis Spitz, PhD, Emeritus Nuffield Professor of Paediatric Surgery, UCL Institute of Child Health, Great Ormond Street, London, for the assistance in the preparation of this report.

Synonyms of Esophageal Atresia and/or Tracheoesophageal Fistula

  • Atresia of Esophagus with or without Tracheoesophageal Fistula
  • Esophageal Atresia
  • Tracheoesophageal Fistula
  • Tracheoesophageal Fistula with or without Esophageal Atresia

Disorder Subdivisions

  • No subdivisions found.

General Discussion

Esophageal atresia (EA) is a rare birth defect in which the esophagus (the tube that connects the throat with the stomach) does not develop normally. In infants with EA, the esophagus is usually separated into two parts, an upper and lower segment. These two segments do not connect. One or both segments (usually the upper) end in a blind pouch. Consequently, the normal passage between the mouth and stomach does not exist. EA often occurs in association with a tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF), which is an abnormal passage or connection (fistula) between the esophagus and the trachea (windpipe). The trachea is the tube that runs from the voice box in the throat to the lungs (bronchi), and carries air to and from the lungs. EA/TEF is a life-threatening condition, however, the majority of affected infants will recover fully if the defect is detected early and treated appropriately. The exact underlying causes of EA/TEF are not fully understood. EA/TEF can occur as isolated findings (nonsyndromic), associated with other birth defects (non-isolated), or as part of a larger syndrome.

Esophageal Atresia and/or Tracheoesophageal Fistula Resources

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