You are here: Home / Rare Disease Information / Rare Disease Database

Search Rare Diseases

Enter a disease name or synonym to search NORD's database of reports.

0-9 - A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z

Smith Magenis Syndrome

Abstract

You are reading a NORD Rare Disease Report Abstract. NORD’s full collection of reports on over 1200 rare diseases is available to subscribers (click here for details). We are now also offering two full rare disease reports per day to visitors on our Web site.

NORD is very grateful to Ann C.M. Smith, M.A., D.Sc.(Hon), Sr. Genetic Counselor/Contractor, SMS Research Studies, Office of the Clinical Director, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, for assistance in the preparation of this report.

Synonyms of Smith Magenis Syndrome

  • chromosome 17, interstitial deletion 17p
  • Chromosome 17p11.2 deletion syndrome
  • SMCR
  • Smith-Magenis chromosome region
  • SMS

Disorder Subdivisions

  • No subdivisions found.

General Discussion

Summary
Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex developmental disorder that affects multiple organ systems of the body. The disorder is characterized by a pattern of abnormalities that are present at birth (congenital) as well as behavioral and cognitive problems. Common symptoms include distinctive facial features, skeletal malformations, varying degrees of intellectual disability, speech and motor delays, sleep disturbances, and self-injurious or attention-seeking behaviors. The specific symptoms present in each case can vary dramatically from one individual to another. Approximately 90% of cases are caused when a portion of chromosome is missing or deleted (monosomic). This deleted portion within chromosome 17p11.2 includes the RAI1 gene, which is believed to play a major role in the development of the disorder. Other genes within the deleted segment may also play a role in variable features in the syndrome, but it is not fully understood how significant a role they play in the development of SMS. In the remaining cases, there is no deleted material on chromosome 17; these cases are caused by mutations in the RAI1 gene.

Introduction
Smith-Magenis syndrome was first reported in the medical literature in 1982 by Ann Smith, a genetic counselor, and colleagues. In 1986, Smith and Dr. R. Ellen Magenis identified nine patients with the disorder further delineating the syndrome. Since that time numerous additional cases have been identified allowing physicians/clinicians to develop a better understanding about this complex disorder.

Smith Magenis Syndrome Resources

NORD Member Organizations:

(To become a member of NORD, an organization must meet established criteria and be approved by the NORD Board of Directors. If you're interested in becoming a member, please contact Susan Olivo, Membership Manager, at solivo@rarediseases.org.)

Other Organizations:

The information in NORD’s Rare Disease Database is for educational purposes only. It should never be used for diagnostic or treatment purposes. If you have questions regarding a medical condition, always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional. NORD’s reports provide a brief overview of rare diseases. For more specific information, we encourage you to contact your personal physician or the agencies listed as “Resources” on this report.

0-9 - A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z

NORD's Rare Disease Information Database is copyrighted and may not be published without the written consent of NORD.

 
Copyright ©2014 NORD - National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. All rights reserved.
The following trademarks/registered service marks are owned by NORD: NORD, National Organization for Rare Disorders, the NORD logo, RareConnect. .